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  1. #31
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Posts
    46

    Default Re: My Submerged System

    That's what I thought - thanks

  2. #32
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Posts
    63

    Default Re: My Submerged System

    It's hard to believe we are just two days short of two years on this system. Two years later and everything (from Puget) is running fine; though I have hated the 5970's (perpetual driver problems with the programs I run) the system overall has been rock solid and taken everything I could possibly have thrown at it.


    System, moved and working, with Spin-Q heatsink.

    My apologies for the poor quality compared to the last shot, but I just moved and the only camera available to me is my phone. As you can see though the Spin-Q is in there running happily, and the bubble bar is no more. Just not worth the hassle for me; function before form.

    On the topic of the move it wasn't as difficult as it could be. I purchased a siphon pump from my local hardware store and spent a leisurely hour-and-half pumping all but the last 2 inches of Oil back into the STP drums. PRO-TIP for anyone looking to move their aquarium PC on the cheap as well, if you get the same style pump I did invest in some hoses from the plumbing aisle. The hoses that come with the hand pump are absolute garbage and packed in such an awful way - they do nothing but collapse. However, the same style of hose that is not garbage and is not FOLDED into the packaging only costs another 4-5$.

    I probably could have pumped the entire system out in half an hour if I didn't have to drive back to the hardware store for some actual, functioning, hose that didn't collapse every pump.

    Cooling performance on the system is solid as ever, with no discernible difference from the original tests, and we have gone two years with nightly power-downs. The only malfunction of note on the cooling system itself was in the Koolance quick-disconnect O-rings - at some point they had bloated and made it right difficult to open the disconnect. Once open the rings split in half, like they do, and cost a total of 1.97$ to get 10 replacements from the local hardware store. #5's in the plumbing section if I remember correctly; obviously I only used two and stored the rest.

    Having just moved and getting setup in a new place I am ever looking to the future, and happy as I am with the cooling setup, will likely purge myself of the 5970's as soon as budget permits. I had been hesitant for so long because I wasn't sure if I wanted to submerge brand-new cards in the oil (the 5970's were only "mostly-new" when they went in), but two years of solid performance is enough to tell me it's worth it. Will test the cards for defects on an air-cooled rig, and if they aren't DefOA I will submerge them forthwith.

    The only question left is what do I replace them with? PCI-E 3.0 cards are backwards compatible with the PCI-E 2.0 slots on this ASUS Rampage III Formula Motherboard board but I am not sure the power/performance gains for the 700 series is worth the scratch when the 600's are going down in price so quickly. AMD is just not in the cards, we are going back to NVIDIA, as the experience with the 5970's has just soiled their side of the fence for me.

  3. #33
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Posts
    1

    Default Re: My Submerged System

    I like your good work.

  4. #34
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Posts
    63

    Default Re: My Submerged System

    We all knew this time was bound to come, and it eventually came to pass for my system. Almost three years to the day to when the system was first powered on in its new oily home, I entered my office this morning to find a line of oil running away from the tank to the edge of the desk. It had happened before when one of the quick-disconnects came loose, so I wasn't concerned, and checked my fittings.

    Unfortunately none were leaking, and I knew there was a greater problem at hand. After a quick draining session back into the original containers the oil had come in (with actual decent tubing, the siphon pump I had picked up at home depot before can do the job in less than a half hour) I was able to inspect the tank on all five sides and find the culprit;



    Luckily this was a small fracture, and not a catastrophic failure. It had only leaked maybe 100ml of fluid onto the desk between when it formed and when it was discovered.

  5. #35
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Posts
    63

    Default Re: My Submerged System

    We are now back up and running; for now in a Cooler Master HAF XB Evo - which is a pretty spiffy case if I do say so.

    Cleaning the oil off the components was surprisingly straightforward and inexpensive. I was able to get my components to the point where, save for being completely devoid of stickers, there was no oily residue to the touch or visible oily areas.

    91% Isopropyl Alcohol was $2.00 per 32oz, and distilled water was $1.50 a Gallon. A Sterilite 18L plastic dish pan was $10, and a cookie cooling rack was $15.

    As it turns out "grease and oil fighting" dish soap is just thickened alcohol, so I ran some personal tests and found that isopropyl alcohol from the medicine cabinet did a great job of breaking it up. I also discovered that once broken up, the oil remnants went to the bottom of the container.

    So I started by placing a cookie cooling rack in a 18L dish wash tub, to act as a platform from the oil that would eventually pool in the bottom, and filled the wash tub to 3-4 inches above the cooling rack with isopropyl alcohol. I then took each component in turn, giving them a brief 3-4 second agitated soak (moving them about while in the alcohol), then poured some extra alcohol over them before setting them aside to dry. Don't forget to discharge all components of power prior to submersing them, and to remove the motherboards CMOS battery.

    I allowed all components to dry for 24 hours. At this point the components were practically clean already, but I could still feel an oily residue when touching them.

    I then repeated the process, but this time with distilled water.

    Again, allowed to dry for 24 hours (I had time to burn waiting for a case to ship in from newegg).

    Then repeated the process, but again with isopropyl alcohol. I did this in part just to be sure, and because I still had a few containers of alcohol left and plenty of free time.

    After another 24 hour drying period the components were all dry and free of oil visibly and to the touch, and went right into the new case where everything powered on and went right back to normal. I haven't had a chance to run any heavy load tests on the system - but I imagine it will run alot warmer than it ever did on oil. One thing of note, is that the system still produces a warm oil smell while running. It will be interesting to see if this fades with time.

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